education

Education and Social Stratification

Conference paper: Standardized determination? The relationship of educational systems and individual employment histories in Europe

Judith Offerhaus ‘Standardized determination? The relationship of educational systems and individual employment histories in Europe'; International Sociological Association World Congress in Yokohama, 13-19 July 2014.

Transitioning through recession? Labour market entry patterns for hard and soft fields of studies before and during the financial crisis

Judith Offerhaus ‘Transitioning through recession? Labour market entry patterns for hard and soft fields of studies before and during the financial crisis’; International Sociological Association World Congress in Yokohama, 13-19 July 2014.

The impact of social origin on graduates' early occupational destinations - An Anglo-German comparison.

This article examines the impact of social origin on tertiary graduates’ labour market outcomes in Germany and the United Kingdom, two distinct countries in terms of higher education systems, labour market structures, and their linkages. Data from the 2005 REFLEX survey, OLS regression and linear probability models are used to analyse the effect of parental education on graduates’ occupational destinations at two time points: at labour market entry and five years after graduation.

Subject choice and inequalities in access to Higher Education: Comparing Scotland and Ireland

AQMeN research briefing 7. Cristina Iannelli and Markus Klein, from the Education and Social Stratification research strand, summarise their recent study which compares the Scottish and Irish education systems. This research analyses the association between school curricula, examination results and university entrance requirements and social inequalities in Higher Education.

Education, social attitudes and social participation among adults in Britain

A stable finding of research on civic participation is the correlation between overall educational attainment and various attributes that are relevant to democracy, such as propensity to be active, to vote, and to hold views on important public issues. But research since the 1990s has suggested that we should be cautious about this inference. The most important question is that raised by the findings of Nie et al.

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